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Extreme Australian Orchestration

Many people have asked me about how I’ve set up my system and what my orchestration process is, so I decided to add a complete walkthrough to the blog. In this screencast, I have recorded myself doing an entire cue from opening the midi file to preparing the final studio-ready score. You can see how I’ve set up my own system to let me get through the process as efficiently as possible. I should point out that the focus here is on the technical side of things; this is not a video about the creative decisions you will face as an orchestrator. That’s what the rest of the blog is for!

How I set up my iPad.

Here is the touch OSC file. It would take a lot of work to set up for your own use, but it may give you some clues as to how to do it.

Main iPad Screen
ipad main

Hairpin Paster
ipad hairpins

My Studio
TD Studio

 


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8 Comments

  1. Thank you for this amazing blog. I have a general question somewhat relating to the beginning of your video when you mentioned leaving the creative side of orchestration for a minute, and focusing on the technical. I’ve run into some confusion and difference of terminology with “arranger” and “orchestrator”, and was wondering your thoughts, especially when it comes to union and non-union rates. Does the term “orchestrator” imply arranging tasks when asked for, and if so, do you consider that different work and/or charge a different rate for those creative skills as opposed to the score prep? I recently did a job where I prepped all the music from midi files, and the “orchestration” (or arranging) was all laid out by the composer (minus some tweaks and midi clean up). Would I be considered an orchestrator or just a copyist? I’m running into differences of opinion and was wondering what you thought about all this! Trying to read those AFofM music prep charts is a bit confusing. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Hi, it is often a fuzzy line. In Hollywood, if you make the score, even from very detailed midi or a pencil sketch it is called and paid as orchestrating. Some people will say everything is there in the midi, just put it on the page. Well, for one, in my many years, there is always something that is missing or needs changing for live players. And there is also the skill you use to just put in dynamics and articulations. You have to listen, and apply your training. Copying is just taking one thing and transferring it, without any thought of if it is correct or playable. Arranging is another thing, where you are given a tune or a form and you write lines and parts. Sometimes it is just adding strings over a pop or hip hop track, others it is doing the whole track, coming up with the harmony etc. Hope this helps

      Reply
  2. […] this feature with another third party program called TouchOSC for the iPad, as shown in the¬?Extreme Australian Orchestration¬?video on his blog […]

    Reply
  3. I have just moved my site and I believe a few comments have been lost in the changeover. Please post and again and I will answer any questions.

    To answer one of them about what I use to align things. That is the TG Move/Align Plugin, from the full suite, not the free one that came with finale. It allows you to set shortcut keys.

    Reply
  4. Unbelievable… the amount of time you spent to work through all these complex issues and come up with a setup like this. WOW. I am in awe and so grateful for the time you took to put together a video like this. Thank you so much, Tim!

    Reply
  5. this is a SEA CHANGE for students (and many professionals). Thanks for this – absolutely sharing with the UM students in 3 – 2 – 1 …

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  6. this is a GREAT video, and you are doing a HUGE service to students and others trying to streamline and work better.
    THANKS!

    Reply
  7. Thanks for taking the time to share your workflow. I’m gonna watch the video in slow motion and steal all your tricks! I have a similar setup for composing and orchestral Mockups (I use lemur instead of touch osc), but in finale I don’t even come close to the speed at wich you work. I own you a beer 🙂

    Reply

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